Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Reducing smokers' exposure to cigarette smoke toxicants -- our first clinical study results | Science Codex

 I've been so busy with life that I almost missed this one:

All test cigarettes were successful in reducing vapour-phase toxicants such as acrolein and 1,3-butadiene, and the reductions in exposure were greater and sometimes much greater than 50 per cent. The test product containing the enzyme-treated tobacco was associated with a statistically significant reduction in tobacco-specific nitrosamines of around 90 per cent, as well as a significant reduction in exposure to the carcinogens 3- and 4-aminobiphenyl of around 40 per cent.

...these results provide the impetus for us to conduct additional further longer-term studies and to develop biomarkers more relevant to biological effects.'

What would happen if most smokers made a conscious effort to smoke less (ie., in moderation) while switching over to harm reduction cigarettes? 


Reducing smokers' exposure to cigarette smoke toxicants -- our first clinical study results | Science Codex

2 comments:

  1. It is interesting how SOME researchers are moving into 'harm reduction' as applied to actually enjoying tobacco, as opposed to, say, ecigs. Has the money-making potential of demonising tobacco run its course?
    So these researchers have found a way to use 'enzymes' to de-toxify tobacco before it is burnt and smoked?
    "The test product containing the enzyme-treated tobacco was associated with a statistically significant reduction in tobacco-specific nitrosamines of around 90 per cent.... 90%! That is huge!
    If that is true, then it is obvious that it would be in the public interest to treat tobacco with these enzymes and thus do away with most of the possible harm. In which case, tobacco control could go home.

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  2. Junican,

    "90%! That is huge! "

    Indeed, it is...and yes, of course it's in the public interest to make tobacco that's treated with these enzymes available to us smokers. All forms of harm reduction are in the public interest, though I think that tobacco harm reduction (for combustibles) has the potential of having the biggest impact. 90+% of us tobacco users smoke after all.

    "In which case, tobacco control could go home. "

    Ahhh..wouldn't that be nice? The time is coming, but brace yourself. I have the feeling that the climate/politics surrounding this issue are going to get a lot meaner and nastier before the last bit of rope unravels:-)

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