Tuesday, February 14, 2012

OpEdNews - Article: Death by Smoking: Still shockingly high in the USA

Thanks to Audrey Silk for posting this on Facebook-

Despite the fact that smoking is more prevalent and better-accepted in other countries, the USA has the world's highest death rates from smoking. 23% of all deaths in America can be traced to smoking, compared to 5% in France and 12% in Japan, both of which have higher smoking rates and lower rates of mortality overall.



Interesting..Maybe someone should study this. Science should take precedence over politics and cultural relativism; unfortunately, it appears that (thanks to the Neo Do-Gooders of Counter Do-Gooderism) we here in the United States appear to be quite content with the status quo, which if left intact, may very well propel us into a scientific dark age.

Here glares at us an absolute truth: The French and the Japanese smoke more and live longer! Why isn't someone over at the FDA looking into this? They are interested in retrieving the truth, are they not (sarcasm intended)? Someone, somewhere needs to find out why this is so.

Scientists should begin by asking some simple questions:

1) Is it the construction (ie., curing, soil content, filtration, ingredients, etc..) of the cigarette itself that can contribute to whether or not a cigarette becomes more or less harmful?

2) What role does diet play in counteracting the ingestion of free-radicals?

3) Does exogenous pollution (ie., from coal plants, automobiles, air travel, etc..) contribute to a higher mortality rate?

These are just a few questions that come to mind. For the love of truth, curiosity, and justice, I can't imagine why there aren't scores of researchers falling all over themselves in order to solve this striking paradox.

Maybe the French and the Japanese are on to something... We should seek to gain some of their knowledge, it would most certainly benefit the world of public health.


OpEdNews - Article: Death by Smoking: Still shockingly high in the USA

6 comments:

  1. I don't think it's necessarily the smoking which is causing the deaths, it's how those deaths are being counted. In Michael McFadden's book, he pointed out that often in studies or when "counting deaths" that epidemiologists would count any death as a "smoking death" even when the death was unrelated to smoking... if the person was a smoker. Die of liver disease and you smoked? Smoking death. And so on.

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  2. I suspect it's because a large percentage of "smoking related deaths" are either not related to smoking at all, or that smoking was merely a minor contributory factor.

    "3) Does exogenous pollution (ie., from coal plants, automobiles, air travel, etc..) contribute to a higher mortality rate?"

    It has been posited that vis-a-vis lung cancer, smoking is a red herring, and that the real culprit is diesel particulates.

    http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/diesel_lung_cancer.html

    Or perhaps it's simply that the French and the Japanese are more honest about the real cause of death.

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  3. Maximilia-

    "In Michael McFadden's book, he pointed out that often in studies or when "counting deaths" that epidemiologists would count any death as a "smoking death" even when the death was unrelated to smoking..."

    I do remember reading that in McFadden's book. I am going to have to look that up again.

    Nisakiman-

    "It has been posited that vis-a-vis lung cancer, smoking is a red herring, and that the real culprit is diesel particulates."

    Thanks for the link. I am going to read it now:-)

    "Or perhaps it's simply that the French and the Japanese are more honest about the real cause of death."

    Now this is something to ponder....

    Junican-

    "It's the money, J, innit."

    It's always about the money!

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  4. It must be the way they are counted. In the USA there is a very powerful anti tobacco lobby which ensures that more deaths are classed as a consequence of smoking. In France this isn't the case. The 5% will be mainly lung cancer deaths. Not many heart related deaths will have been included.

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  5. Jonathan-

    "It must be the way they are counted."

    It's most likely part of the overall equation.

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